A Wildlife Habitat Just Off The LINQ Roadway

Duck
Among the residents of Flamingo Las Vegas’s Wildlife Habitat is this white-faced whistling duck.
Photo by Diane Taylor

Last week I dropped off a friend and her visitor at the LINQ’s High Roller so they could experience the world’s tallest observation wheel. In the meantime, I walked the LINQ roadway and even made my way to an entrance off the roadway into the Flamingo Las Vegas. Walking in, I noticed crowds and made a quick left turn to the Flamingo’s Wildlife Habitat.

My husband an I have been permanent residents of Las Vegas for 11 1/2 years, so we had somehow missed the evolution of the Wildlife Habitat. The penguins have been gone for about five years, I’m told, and instead, the other residents of the area have become more important and more plentiful. They’ve also been joined by several rather spectacular pelicans.

Of course the Flamingo Las Vegas Wildlife Habitat would feature flamingos -- pink Chilean Famingos that are the subjects of many visitor pictures.  Photo by Diane Taylor
Of course the Flamingo Las Vegas Wildlife Habitat would feature flamingos — pink Chilean famingos that are the subjects of many visitor pictures.
Photo by Diane Taylor
single Flamingo
Are those legs really strong enough?
Photo by Diane Taylor
Waterfall
The Wildlife Habitat even contains a couple waterfalls and several fountains.
Photo by Diane Taylor
Japanese Koi and Albino Channel Catfish in the habitat lakes appear to be "fat and happy" fish (the female koi are full of eggs, we're told).  A habitat sign notes that the Japanese Koi can reach over three feet in length and weigh up to 30 pounds.  The fish are prized for bright patterns and colors and can live for up to 60 years with good care. Photo by Diane Taylor
Japanese Koi and Albino Channel Catfish in the habitat lakes appear to be "fat and happy" fish (the female koi are full of eggs, we're told). A habitat sign notes that the Japanese Koi can reach over three feet in length and weigh up to 30 pounds. The fish are prized for bright patterns and colors and can live for up to 60 years with good care.
Photo by Diane Taylor
Greenery
The lush vegetation at the Wildlife Habitat features 10-year-old Pointed Leaf Ivy whose leaves are huge and lush and are cared for by a habitat gardener.
Photo by Diane Taylor
Pelican
Relative newcomers (2012) to the habitat are pelicans. A staff of three cares for the animals in the habitat.
Photo by Diane Taylor
A number of colorful parrots are typically on hand at the Wildlife Habitat. They do have a trainer nearby to wrangle and entertain the sometimes noisy technicolor birds.  Photo by Diane Taylor
A number of colorful parrots are typically on hand at the Wildlife Habitat. They do have a trainer nearby to wrangle and entertain the sometimes noisy technicolor birds.
Photo by Diane Taylor
Watching the cool swans, even in black and white, can be a great respite from an afternoon of intensity at a Flamingo slot machine.  Photo by Diane Taylor
Watching the cool swans, even in black and white, can be a great respite from an afternoon of intensity at a Flamingo slot machine.
Photo by Diane Taylor
Water tightropes
In the warmer months, the habitat’s water turtles can be seen sunning themselves. In the winter, says a habitat sign, these turtles can hide themselves under rocks for up to four months.
Photo by Diane Taylor
Video
NOTE: Want to catch up on basketball while walking the LINQ roadway? A video screen has been erected in the middle of the roadway, and after the commercial (playing when this photo was taken), the subject was March Madness basketball!
Photo by Diane Taylor

Comments

3 responses on “A Wildlife Habitat Just Off The LINQ Roadway

  1. LOVE IT!!! My favorites – birds and fish especialy KOI. Thank you for the “tour”. Hope to still see your place and area. I can only look at the photos over and over to give me some joy. Thank you!!!

    Agree with Hugh -Your Dad and Mom would be so proud of you (especially your Dad).

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