Los Feliz Murder Mansion Sold, Ghosts and All

The infamous Los Feliz Murder Mansion as it appears today. The yellow streak across the center window is the staircase, which always seems to have an unsettling, ominous glow to it.Photo by Osie Turner
The infamous Los Feliz Murder Mansion as it appears today. The yellow streak across the center window is the staircase, which always seems to have an unsettling, ominous glow to it.
Photo by Osie Turner

On a quiet Sunday night in early December 1959, an 11 year old girl name Debbie awoke to a scream and some strange noises coming from her sister’s room. She got up to see what the fuss was about, and, sleepy eyed, walked down the dark hallway when her frightened and bleeding older sister, Judye, ran screaming down the stairs. “Go back to bed, this is a nightmare,” her father, who held a blood-soaked ball-peen hammer, told her. It was not a bad dream. It was real. Such was the beginning of the legend of the Los Feliz Murder Mansion.

Judye managed to survive the brutal attack with a fractured skull, and in an apparent change of mind, their father did not attack Debbie or their younger brother who was also in the house. Their mother was not so lucky—she was beaten to death with the hammer before the assault on Judye. Shortly after the encounter with Debbie, her father, a cardiologist named Dr. Harold Perelson, took a handful of tranquilizers and sedatives, laid on the floor next to his dead wife and went to sleep with the hammer still in his hand. He was dead by the time the police and ambulance arrived.

The house was foreclosed and auctioned off within a year of the horrific night. The legend goes that the new owners never moved into the house and everything inside the house remained exactly as it was left in the aftermath of the murder-suicide for the next 60 years. Quite naturally, this spawned tales of the spectral form of Dr. Perelson walking past the windows and ghostly screams emanating from the abandoned mansion.

Also as expected, the ghost stories of the admittedly creepy looking house drew curious teenagers and later ghost hunters to check out the place for themselves. Many decided to break in, but most were content to just peer in through the windows and wander around the property, to the chagrin of neighbors in this posh neighborhood.

The mansion was indeed privately owned since 1960; however, it may not have been uninhabited. The Enrique family, which owned the murder mansion until 2015, may have lived in it briefly and according to Rudy Enrique, who eventually inherited the house from his parents, it was in fact their own furniture that filled the house. The Perelson family’s belongs were moved out prior to the auction.

The Los Feliz Murder Mansion as seen from the street.Photo by Osie Turner
The Los Feliz Murder Mansion as seen from the street.
Photo by Osie Turner

Ghosts or no ghosts, the murder mansion was cleaned out and put on the market in March, 2016. In July, a young couple, Lisa Bloom and her husband Braden Pollock, purchased the murder mansion and stated that they plan to fully renovate and move into the house. As can be seen in the photos, a fence has been put up around the house and repairs should begin soon, if they have not begun already. At a sale price of $2.289 million it was a steal for that neighborhood, even accounting for all that would need to be done to fix the house up. Similar sized homes in good condition in the area usually sell in the $5 million range, so this could be a very smart investment. There is some speculation that they may simply demolish the house and build an entirely new one on the lot, but that remains to be seen.

With a promising future, it looks like the murder mansion may finally be able to move past the terrible incident of that fateful night in 1959 at long last. If you want to see the house before it is either altered or rebuilt, you can find it at 2475 Glendower Place. However, keep in mind this is a residential area and it is on a narrow dead end street. All of the neighbors have surveillance cameras pointed at the street as a result of unscrupulous ghost hunters and thrill seekers that have broken into the house over the years. It is a public road though, so it is fine to gawk at it from the street and take a few photos of it if you so wish. I just wouldn’t recommend staying too long or succumbing to the temptation to see if any screams can still be heard there late at night.

For more about the murder-suicide that spawned this urban legend, there is an excellent article on medium.com that I highly recommend.

Comments

5 responses on “Los Feliz Murder Mansion Sold, Ghosts and All

  1. Mark- I’m sure they are! It seems like the house was not as well known until the last ten years or so, before that it was probably just a neighborhood secret/legend. The internet had a lot to do with it becoming a thing. I bet the kids in the area dared each other to knock on the door at night. If they didn’t, then they squandered a prime opportunity!

  2. Holly- I agree; with a little TLC that would be a really beautiful house with a killer view (I couldn’t resist)! I didn’t come across anything about the children after that night, other than a messageboard that speculated that Judye might be on Facebook haha. That would be alot to deal with and live through, so I hope they got the care they would have needed by whoever adopted them.

  3. In the early-mid 90’s I was a part-time docent at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis-Brown house around the corner and drove by the Perelson house quite often. You’re right, it was a local legend in the neighborhood and that staircase in the window had so many moods – especially just after day-break, or at dusk, or when the weather was dreary and raining. Whether they gut the place or not, I’m sure the new owners are going to have some stories to tell not long after they move in! (which, btw, it’s nice to see an author, Lisa Bloom, be able to afford a $3M house – lol (granted, she’s not just an author :-). Love your “young couple” reference too since her and I are the same age!)

Speak Your Mind

Let us know what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!

In order to comment, we have to collect some data:
This form collects your name, email and content so that we can keep track of the comments placed on the website. For more info check our privacy policy where you will get more info on where, how and why we store your data.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.